Measuring the physiological response to heat stress in a climatic chamber. Two women technicians monitor equipment to which a man, in a controlled environment to the left, is connected via numerous electrodes attached to his body. WHO photo by Novosti.
via Images from the History of Medicine

Measuring the physiological response to heat stress in a climatic chamber. Two women technicians monitor equipment to which a man, in a controlled environment to the left, is connected via numerous electrodes attached to his body. WHO photo by Novosti.

via Images from the History of Medicine

Pre-PET Headgear (Positron Emission Tomography)
In 1961, chemists at brookhavenlab studied how to detect small brain tumors by analyzing the decay of radioactive material injected into the patient’s bloodstream and preferentially absorbed by the tumor. To help them, BNL’s Instrumentation Division built different arrays of detectors, and this circular type proved best. In the 1970’s, BNL helped reconstruct the raw data received by the detectors into an image of the working brain. This breakthrough led to more practical devices for imaging areas of the brain: today’s PET machines. Today, Brookhaven is a leader in addiction research. BNL scientists use PET technology to study major areas of medical research including, drug and alcohol addiction; the development of a new strategy for addiction treatment; obesity and eating disorders; attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); aging and neurodegenerative disorders.
via Brookhaven National Laboratory

Pre-PET Headgear (Positron Emission Tomography)

In 1961, chemists at brookhavenlab studied how to detect small brain tumors by analyzing the decay of radioactive material injected into the patient’s bloodstream and preferentially absorbed by the tumor. To help them, BNL’s Instrumentation Division built different arrays of detectors, and this circular type proved best. In the 1970’s, BNL helped reconstruct the raw data received by the detectors into an image of the working brain. This breakthrough led to more practical devices for imaging areas of the brain: today’s PET machines. Today, Brookhaven is a leader in addiction research. BNL scientists use PET technology to study major areas of medical research including, drug and alcohol addiction; the development of a new strategy for addiction treatment; obesity and eating disorders; attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); aging and neurodegenerative disorders.

via Brookhaven National Laboratory

Wilson A. Bentley (American, 1865-1931): Group of Four Snow Crystals, circa 1905. Gold toned photomicrographs.

via Heritage Auctions

Taking shower with detergent. Photo: W. Eugene Smith/LIFE.
In: LIFE, 26 Sep 1949.

Taking shower with detergent. Photo: W. Eugene Smith/LIFE.

In: LIFE, 26 Sep 1949.

Randolph Field, TX. Cpl. Charles F. Morris of Bristow, OK, an assistant instructor of aviation medical examiners at the US Air Force School of Aviation Medicine, is just all eyes these days. These two giant specimens are used in classes to teach the fundamental actions of the muscles used by the eyes and they even light up in real life fashion. Moved by two small motors, the large-sized eyes also enable large groups to see its actions in classroom discussions, and are another of the instruments developed by aero medical researchers in the continuing program of aviation medicine.
via Otis Historical Archives – National Museum of Health and Medicine

Randolph Field, TX. Cpl. Charles F. Morris of Bristow, OK, an assistant instructor of aviation medical examiners at the US Air Force School of Aviation Medicine, is just all eyes these days. These two giant specimens are used in classes to teach the fundamental actions of the muscles used by the eyes and they even light up in real life fashion. Moved by two small motors, the large-sized eyes also enable large groups to see its actions in classroom discussions, and are another of the instruments developed by aero medical researchers in the continuing program of aviation medicine.

via Otis Historical Archives – National Museum of Health and Medicine

Scale model of the SR-71 Blackbird at the NASA Dryden Flow Visualization Facility (FVF), where researchers study highly complex 3-dimensional vortex flow on aircraft configurations in water tunnels.
Photo: NASA 

Scale model of the SR-71 Blackbird at the NASA Dryden Flow Visualization Facility (FVF), where researchers study highly complex 3-dimensional vortex flow on aircraft configurations in water tunnels.

Photo: NASA 

In this computer generated photograph, created from a cross section of Saturn’s rings by Voyager 2 photopolarimeter’s star occulation, the Encke Division in the outer A-ring. Clearly shown is the central ringlet, also observed by the imaging cameras. Creator: NASA/Ames Research Center, date: 8/25/1981.
via archive.org

In this computer generated photograph, created from a cross section of Saturn’s rings by Voyager 2 photopolarimeter’s star occulation, the Encke Division in the outer A-ring. Clearly shown is the central ringlet, also observed by the imaging cameras. Creator: NASA/Ames Research Center, date: 8/25/1981.

via archive.org

Visitors to the American Museum of Atomic Energy, now AMSE, learn about radioactive isotopes in the Museum’s original location on Warehouse Road in Oak Ridge. Circa 1949.
via American Museum of Science and Energy

Visitors to the American Museum of Atomic Energy, now AMSE, learn about radioactive isotopes in the Museum’s original location on Warehouse Road in Oak Ridge. Circa 1949.

via American Museum of Science and Energy

Los Alamos chemist, Wright H. Langham with Plastic Man, used to simulate human radiation exposures, 1959.
via Los Alamos National Laboratory 
In 1945, three terminally ill cancer patients at the University of Chicago’s Billings Hospital were injected with a solution containing plutonium as part of a U.S. government research project involving 18 subjects. The project was designed to determine how quickly the body rids itself of plutonium. Its purpose was to develop safety criteria for the thousands of workers then handling plutonium.
This research was made public by the Energy Research & Development Administration in 1976. Stories followed in the Washington Post and in Science in 1976. A scientific paper on the experiment, “Distribution and Excretion of Plutonium Administered Intravenously to Man,” was published in Health Physics in June 1980 (written by: Samuel H. Bassett,  Wright Langham).
Two of the three patients who received injections at Chicago died of their cancer within five months, according to the 1976 report. The third patient, an 18-year-old male with Hodgkins disease, left the hospital against medical advice and was “lost to follow-up,” according to the report.
A follow-up study found no evidence that the plutonium injections affected the health of the subjects or their pre-existing illnesses.
Research standards have changed drastically since 1945. Today, no research is or can be performed on any patients without their full knowledge and informed, written consent. (via)

Los Alamos chemist, Wright H. Langham with Plastic Man, used to simulate human radiation exposures, 1959.

via Los Alamos National Laboratory 

In 1945, three terminally ill cancer patients at the University of Chicago’s Billings Hospital were injected with a solution containing plutonium as part of a U.S. government research project involving 18 subjects. The project was designed to determine how quickly the body rids itself of plutonium. Its purpose was to develop safety criteria for the thousands of workers then handling plutonium.

This research was made public by the Energy Research & Development Administration in 1976. Stories followed in the Washington Post and in Science in 1976. A scientific paper on the experiment, “Distribution and Excretion of Plutonium Administered Intravenously to Man,” was published in Health Physics in June 1980 (written by: Samuel H. Bassett,  Wright Langham).

Two of the three patients who received injections at Chicago died of their cancer within five months, according to the 1976 report. The third patient, an 18-year-old male with Hodgkins disease, left the hospital against medical advice and was “lost to follow-up,” according to the report.

A follow-up study found no evidence that the plutonium injections affected the health of the subjects or their pre-existing illnesses.

Research standards have changed drastically since 1945. Today, no research is or can be performed on any patients without their full knowledge and informed, written consent. (via)

Edward Teller and his mother and sister in 1911.
via Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Edward Teller and his mother and sister in 1911.

via Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory