STS-1 - Spotlighted Space Shuttle Columbia stands out dramatically against the night sky at Kennedy Space Center. The lights to the left of the Shuttle, also reflected in the nearby waters of the Center’s environmentally rich lagoon system, outline the fixed and rotating service structures. The rotating structure, which obscures the view of the Orbiter when in place, has been retracted to allow modifications that will provide access to debonded insulation panels on the Shuttle’s external tank. 02/19/1981
via Space Shuttle Program/Facebook

STS-1 - Spotlighted Space Shuttle Columbia stands out dramatically against the night sky at Kennedy Space Center. The lights to the left of the Shuttle, also reflected in the nearby waters of the Center’s environmentally rich lagoon system, outline the fixed and rotating service structures. The rotating structure, which obscures the view of the Orbiter when in place, has been retracted to allow modifications that will provide access to debonded insulation panels on the Shuttle’s external tank. 02/19/1981

via Space Shuttle Program/Facebook

Project Mercury astronaut M. Scott Carpenter practices manual control of a spacecraft in the Air Lubricated Free Attitude (ALFA) trainer located at NASA’s Langley Air Force Base, Virginia. This trainer allows the astronaut to see the image of Earth’s surface at his feet while manually controlling the spacecraft. Carpenter has been selected as the prime pilot of the United States’ second orbital flight. (1961)
Photo credit: NASA

Project Mercury astronaut M. Scott Carpenter practices manual control of a spacecraft in the Air Lubricated Free Attitude (ALFA) trainer located at NASA’s Langley Air Force Base, Virginia. This trainer allows the astronaut to see the image of Earth’s surface at his feet while manually controlling the spacecraft. Carpenter has been selected as the prime pilot of the United States’ second orbital flight. (1961)

Photo credit: NASA

Artist’s concept paintings depicting the American and Soviet spacecrafts in Earth orbit during the July 1975 Apollo-Soyuz Test Project mission.

The first docking of spacecraft from two different nations happened on July 17, 1975. The American and Soviet ASTP crewmen visited each other’s spacecraft while Apollo and Soyuz were docked for two days. The docking system on the Docking Module and the docking system on the Soyuz Orbital Module are designed to interface with each other. 

Artists: Paul Fjeld (1-5), Davis Meltzer (6-8) and Robert McCall (9).

Source: NASA Human Spaceflight gallery

VAB interior. In: Saturn V Flight Manual SA507, 15 August 1969. (.PDF)

VAB interior. In: Saturn V Flight Manual SA507, 15 August 1969. (.PDF)

31 Jan. 1978. The first female astronaut candidates. 
These six mission specialist astronaut candidates are the first women ASCANs to be named by NASA. They are, left to right, Rhea Seddon, Anna L. Fisher, Judith A. Resnik, Shannon W. Lucid, Sally K. Ride and Kathryn D. Sullivan. 
Photo credit: NASA

31 Jan. 1978. The first female astronaut candidates.

These six mission specialist astronaut candidates are the first women ASCANs to be named by NASA. They are, left to right, Rhea Seddon, Anna L. Fisher, Judith A. Resnik, Shannon W. Lucid, Sally K. Ride and Kathryn D. Sullivan. 

Photo credit: NASA

S83-35782 (18 June 1983) —- An Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS) engine firing caused this bright glow at the aft end of the Earth-orbiting space shuttle Challenger on June 18, 1983. Also visible in the 70mm exposure are parts of the Shuttle Pallet Satellite (SPAS-01). The experiment package for NASA’s Office of Space and Terrestrial Applications (OSTA-2), the protective cradles for the Indonesian Palapa-B and Telesat Canada Anik C2 satellites, some getaway special (GAS) canisters and the Canadian-built Remote Manipulator System (RMS). The firing took place less than an hour after deployment of Anik. 
Photo credit: NASA.

S83-35782 (18 June 1983) —- An Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS) engine firing caused this bright glow at the aft end of the Earth-orbiting space shuttle Challenger on June 18, 1983. Also visible in the 70mm exposure are parts of the Shuttle Pallet Satellite (SPAS-01). The experiment package for NASA’s Office of Space and Terrestrial Applications (OSTA-2), the protective cradles for the Indonesian Palapa-B and Telesat Canada Anik C2 satellites, some getaway special (GAS) canisters and the Canadian-built Remote Manipulator System (RMS). The firing took place less than an hour after deployment of Anik.

Photo credit: NASA.

Scale model of the SR-71 Blackbird at the NASA Dryden Flow Visualization Facility (FVF), where researchers study highly complex 3-dimensional vortex flow on aircraft configurations in water tunnels.
Photo: NASA 

Scale model of the SR-71 Blackbird at the NASA Dryden Flow Visualization Facility (FVF), where researchers study highly complex 3-dimensional vortex flow on aircraft configurations in water tunnels.

Photo: NASA 

Old NASA badge. (NASA “worm” logotype 1975–1992).

Old NASA badge. (NASA “worm” logotype 1975–1992).

Happy 15th Birthday, Space Station!
s99_03778 In December 1998, the crew of Space Shuttle Mission STS-88 began construction of the International Space Station, joining the U.S.-built Unity node to the Russian-built Zarya module. The crew carried a large-format IMAX® camera from which this picture was taken. - Astronaut James Newman making final connections to Unity

Happy 15th Birthday, Space Station!

s99_03778 In December 1998, the crew of Space Shuttle Mission STS-88 began construction of the International Space Station, joining the U.S.-built Unity node to the Russian-built Zarya module. The crew carried a large-format IMAX® camera from which this picture was taken. - Astronaut James Newman making final connections to Unity