"Anatomical Venuses" were life-sized wax anatomical models of idealized women, extremely realistic in appearance and often adorned with real hair and ornamental jewelry. This one is from the workshop of Felice Fontana, Florence, Italy, circa 1780-1785. From the collection of the Semmelweis Museum, Budapest.

more: 29 Anatomical Models That Will Haunt Your Dreams Tonight

Az emberi test. Bayer reklámkiadvány, c1930. Nyomás: Klösz Coloroffset, Budapest.

The human body. Advertising brochure by Bayer, c1930.

Measuring the physiological response to heat stress in a climatic chamber. Two women technicians monitor equipment to which a man, in a controlled environment to the left, is connected via numerous electrodes attached to his body. WHO photo by Novosti.
via Images from the History of Medicine

Measuring the physiological response to heat stress in a climatic chamber. Two women technicians monitor equipment to which a man, in a controlled environment to the left, is connected via numerous electrodes attached to his body. WHO photo by Novosti.

via Images from the History of Medicine

George Mayerle test charts, Schmidt Litho Co., c1907

"[Mayerle’s] eye chart … combined four subjective tests done during an eye examination. Running through the middle of the chart, the seven vertical panels test for acuity of vision with characters in the Roman alphabet (for English, German, and other European readers) and also in Japanese, Chinese, Russian, and Hebrew. A panel in the center replaces the alphabetic characters with symbols for children and adults who were illiterate or who could not read any of the other writing systems offered. Directly above the center panel is a version of the radiant dial that tests for astigmatism. On either side of that are lines that test the muscular strength of the eyes. Finally, across the bottom, boxes test for color vision, a feature intended especially (according to one advertisement) for those working on railroads and steamboats"

via Images from the History of Medicine 1, 2

Masks worn during experiments with Plague. Philippines, probably around 1912.
via Otis Historical Archives/National Museum of Health and Medicine

Masks worn during experiments with Plague. Philippines, probably around 1912.

via Otis Historical Archives/National Museum of Health and Medicine

Pre-PET Headgear (Positron Emission Tomography)
In 1961, chemists at brookhavenlab studied how to detect small brain tumors by analyzing the decay of radioactive material injected into the patient’s bloodstream and preferentially absorbed by the tumor. To help them, BNL’s Instrumentation Division built different arrays of detectors, and this circular type proved best. In the 1970’s, BNL helped reconstruct the raw data received by the detectors into an image of the working brain. This breakthrough led to more practical devices for imaging areas of the brain: today’s PET machines. Today, Brookhaven is a leader in addiction research. BNL scientists use PET technology to study major areas of medical research including, drug and alcohol addiction; the development of a new strategy for addiction treatment; obesity and eating disorders; attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); aging and neurodegenerative disorders.
via Brookhaven National Laboratory

Pre-PET Headgear (Positron Emission Tomography)

In 1961, chemists at brookhavenlab studied how to detect small brain tumors by analyzing the decay of radioactive material injected into the patient’s bloodstream and preferentially absorbed by the tumor. To help them, BNL’s Instrumentation Division built different arrays of detectors, and this circular type proved best. In the 1970’s, BNL helped reconstruct the raw data received by the detectors into an image of the working brain. This breakthrough led to more practical devices for imaging areas of the brain: today’s PET machines. Today, Brookhaven is a leader in addiction research. BNL scientists use PET technology to study major areas of medical research including, drug and alcohol addiction; the development of a new strategy for addiction treatment; obesity and eating disorders; attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); aging and neurodegenerative disorders.

via Brookhaven National Laboratory

Nurses working at sterilizing equipment.
via Otis Historical Archives – National Museum of Health and Medicine

Nurses working at sterilizing equipment.

via Otis Historical Archives – National Museum of Health and Medicine

Randolph Field, TX. Cpl. Charles F. Morris of Bristow, OK, an assistant instructor of aviation medical examiners at the US Air Force School of Aviation Medicine, is just all eyes these days. These two giant specimens are used in classes to teach the fundamental actions of the muscles used by the eyes and they even light up in real life fashion. Moved by two small motors, the large-sized eyes also enable large groups to see its actions in classroom discussions, and are another of the instruments developed by aero medical researchers in the continuing program of aviation medicine.
via Otis Historical Archives – National Museum of Health and Medicine

Randolph Field, TX. Cpl. Charles F. Morris of Bristow, OK, an assistant instructor of aviation medical examiners at the US Air Force School of Aviation Medicine, is just all eyes these days. These two giant specimens are used in classes to teach the fundamental actions of the muscles used by the eyes and they even light up in real life fashion. Moved by two small motors, the large-sized eyes also enable large groups to see its actions in classroom discussions, and are another of the instruments developed by aero medical researchers in the continuing program of aviation medicine.

via Otis Historical Archives – National Museum of Health and Medicine

Iron lung patient, Robert Vande Zande is being briefed prior to take off for the Great Lakes Naval Hospital,1952. 
Photo: U.S. Navy BUMED Library and Archives

Iron lung patient, Robert Vande Zande is being briefed prior to take off for the Great Lakes Naval Hospital,1952.

Photo: U.S. Navy BUMED Library and Archives