S80-37406 (14-24 Nov. 1969) —- This photograph of the eclipse of the sun was taken with a 16mm motion picture camera from the Apollo 12 spacecraft during its trans-Earth journey home from the moon. The fascinating view was created when the Earth moved directly between the sun and the Apollo 12 spacecraft. Aboard Apollo 12 were astronauts Charles Conrad Jr., commander; Richard F. Gordon Jr., command module pilot; and Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot. While astronauts Conrad and Bean descended in the Lunar Module (LM) “Intrepid” to explore the Ocean of Storms region of the moon, astronaut Gordon remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) “Yankee Clipper” in lunar orbit.
via IFLS

S80-37406 (14-24 Nov. 1969) —- This photograph of the eclipse of the sun was taken with a 16mm motion picture camera from the Apollo 12 spacecraft during its trans-Earth journey home from the moon. The fascinating view was created when the Earth moved directly between the sun and the Apollo 12 spacecraft. Aboard Apollo 12 were astronauts Charles Conrad Jr., commander; Richard F. Gordon Jr., command module pilot; and Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot. While astronauts Conrad and Bean descended in the Lunar Module (LM) “Intrepid” to explore the Ocean of Storms region of the moon, astronaut Gordon remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) “Yankee Clipper” in lunar orbit.

via IFLS

S83-35782 (18 June 1983) —- An Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS) engine firing caused this bright glow at the aft end of the Earth-orbiting space shuttle Challenger on June 18, 1983. Also visible in the 70mm exposure are parts of the Shuttle Pallet Satellite (SPAS-01). The experiment package for NASA’s Office of Space and Terrestrial Applications (OSTA-2), the protective cradles for the Indonesian Palapa-B and Telesat Canada Anik C2 satellites, some getaway special (GAS) canisters and the Canadian-built Remote Manipulator System (RMS). The firing took place less than an hour after deployment of Anik. 
Photo credit: NASA.

S83-35782 (18 June 1983) —- An Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS) engine firing caused this bright glow at the aft end of the Earth-orbiting space shuttle Challenger on June 18, 1983. Also visible in the 70mm exposure are parts of the Shuttle Pallet Satellite (SPAS-01). The experiment package for NASA’s Office of Space and Terrestrial Applications (OSTA-2), the protective cradles for the Indonesian Palapa-B and Telesat Canada Anik C2 satellites, some getaway special (GAS) canisters and the Canadian-built Remote Manipulator System (RMS). The firing took place less than an hour after deployment of Anik.

Photo credit: NASA.

Space tandem. Rouxel et Dubois, Paris. Artist: Ferdinand Lunel, 1895.
via BNF

Space tandem. Rouxel et Dubois, Paris. Artist: Ferdinand Lunel, 1895.

via BNF

Halley, 1986. 

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Mosaic of different ERS-2 results. Like its predecessor ERS-1 (launched in July 1991 by an Ariane 40 and successfully operational in-orbit at an altitude of some 780 Km), the ERS-2 satellite launched on 21.04.95 by a Ariane 40, is monitoring the Earth day and night under all weather conditions thanks to its powerful sharp-eyed, clouds piercing radars. ERS-2 is moreover carrying an instrument which helps monitor the ozone layer around the Earth. Photo: ESA.

Mosaic of different ERS-2 results. Like its predecessor ERS-1 (launched in July 1991 by an Ariane 40 and successfully operational in-orbit at an altitude of some 780 Km), the ERS-2 satellite launched on 21.04.95 by a Ariane 40, is monitoring the Earth day and night under all weather conditions thanks to its powerful sharp-eyed, clouds piercing radars. ERS-2 is moreover carrying an instrument which helps monitor the ozone layer around the Earth. Photo: ESA.

"well it’s not on the flight plan"
Apollo Astronaut Shares Story of NASA’s Earthrise Photo
Anders said after the first two-and-a-half to three orbits, they were going backwards, head down, marveling at the lunar surface, and it wasn’t until after they had made a, &#8220;collective maneuver to circularize our orbit at 60 nautical miles, that we rolled over, heads up and turned around, going forward, like you would be driving a car around the moon.&#8221;The crew was in sunlight and Anders was shooting pictures out of the side of the spacecraft, as this was one of his designated jobs."I don’t know who said it, maybe all of us said, ‘Oh my God. Look at that!’"Anders said. "And up came the Earth. We had had no discussion on the ground, no briefing, no instructions on what to do. I jokingly said, ‘well it’s not on the flight plan,’ and the other two guys were yelling at me to give them cameras. I had the only color camera with a long lens. So I floated a black and white over to Borman. I can’t remember what Lovell got. There were all yelling for cameras, and we started snapping away."

"well it’s not on the flight plan"

Apollo Astronaut Shares Story of NASA’s Earthrise Photo

Anders said after the first two-and-a-half to three orbits, they were going backwards, head down, marveling at the lunar surface, and it wasn’t until after they had made a, “collective maneuver to circularize our orbit at 60 nautical miles, that we rolled over, heads up and turned around, going forward, like you would be driving a car around the moon.”

The crew was in sunlight and Anders was shooting pictures out of the side of the spacecraft, as this was one of his designated jobs.

"I don’t know who said it, maybe all of us said, ‘Oh my God. Look at that!’"Anders said. "And up came the Earth. We had had no discussion on the ground, no briefing, no instructions on what to do. I jokingly said, ‘well it’s not on the flight plan,’ and the other two guys were yelling at me to give them cameras. I had the only color camera with a long lens. So I floated a black and white over to Borman. I can’t remember what Lovell got. There were all yelling for cameras, and we started snapping away."

The morning sun reflects on the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean as seen from the Apollo 7 spacecraft at an altitude of 120 nautical miles above Earth. Most of Florida peninsula appears as a dark silhouette. This photograph was made during the spacecraft&#8217;s 134th revolution of Earth, some 213 hours and 19 minutes after liftoff. 20 Oct, 1968.
Photo: NASA.

The morning sun reflects on the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean as seen from the Apollo 7 spacecraft at an altitude of 120 nautical miles above Earth. Most of Florida peninsula appears as a dark silhouette. This photograph was made during the spacecraft’s 134th revolution of Earth, some 213 hours and 19 minutes after liftoff. 20 Oct, 1968.

Photo: NASA.

Elliott Dold: Science fiction interior pulp illustration, c1940.

Elliott Dold: Science fiction interior pulp illustration, c1940.

Втopoй  космический  коpaбль - cпутник &#8220;Восток-2&#8221; c Г. С. Титовым. 6.VIII.1961.Gherman Titov, the 2nd soviet cosmonaut orbiting the Earth on board Vostok 2, the second spaceship, 6 August 1961. Soviet matchbox label, 1962.

Втopoй  космический  коpaбль - cпутник “Восток-2” c Г. С. Титовым. 6.VIII.1961.

Gherman Titov, the 2nd soviet cosmonaut orbiting the Earth on board Vostok 2, the second spaceship, 6 August 1961. Soviet matchbox label, 1962.

 Zemlja. Yugoslavian matchbox label, space exploration, 1/10. c1960.

Zemlja. Yugoslavian matchbox label, space exploration, 1/10. c1960.