Frederick Bartlett and David Ritchie, Fermilab, 03/16/1981.

Frederick Bartlett and David Ritchie, Fermilab, 03/16/1981.

Polimer, Magna LHS 10, home computer cassette tape. Made in Western-Germany.

Polimer, Magna LHS 10, home computer cassette tape. Made in Western-Germany.

5.25 inch floppy disk, c1990.

5.25 inch floppy disk, c1990.

Вычислительный центр Академи наук СССР. Работает “Стрела-3”. Огонёк No. 12. Март 1959. Фото Дм. Бальтерманца
Strela-3 computer in the computing center of the Academy of Sciences of the USSR. In: Ogoniok March 15, 1959. Photo: Dmitry Baltermants.

Вычислительный центр Академи наук СССР. Работает “Стрела-3”. Огонёк No. 12. Март 1959. Фото Дм. Бальтерманца

Strela-3 computer in the computing center of the Academy of Sciences of the USSR. In: Ogoniok March 15, 1959. Photo: Dmitry Baltermants.

Enter-News 2/88 April-Juni. Die Zeitschrift für den Enterprise-Computer 64k und 128k.
via ep128.hu

Enter-News 2/88 April-Juni. Die Zeitschrift für den Enterprise-Computer 64k und 128k.

via ep128.hu

Control room. Text on the left side monitor: NASA Lewis Research Center 9X15 LOW SPEED WIND TUNNEL. 11:19:28 3/6/1989
Photo credit: NASA/Glenn Research Center via archive.org

Control roomText on the left side monitor: NASA Lewis Research Center 9X15 LOW SPEED WIND TUNNEL. 11:19:28 3/6/1989

Photo credit: NASA/Glenn Research Center via archive.org

UNIVAC console.
The UNIVAC at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory had a large console with a series of switches that could be set to address each of the machine’s 1,000 words of memory. Once set, the contents of that memory location would be displayed on the console’s oscilloscope. An electric typewriter could be used to direct the machine and was useful for debugging. The largest data system was a set of ten tape units, designed to read and write backwards and forwards. These served as an expanded main memory, allowing larger data volumes and even larger programs than would fit in the small amount of main memory.
via LLNL Flickr

UNIVAC console.

The UNIVAC at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory had a large console with a series of switches that could be set to address each of the machine’s 1,000 words of memory. Once set, the contents of that memory location would be displayed on the console’s oscilloscope. An electric typewriter could be used to direct the machine and was useful for debugging. The largest data system was a set of ten tape units, designed to read and write backwards and forwards. These served as an expanded main memory, allowing larger data volumes and even larger programs than would fit in the small amount of main memory.

via LLNL Flickr

IBM computer display. In: LIFE Science Library - The engineer by C. C. Furnas, Joe McCarty and the Editors of TIME - LIFE BOOKS (hungarian edition by Műszaki Könyvkiadó,1972).

IBM computer display. In: LIFE Science Library - The engineer by C. C. Furnas, Joe McCarty and the Editors of TIME - LIFE BOOKS (hungarian edition by Műszaki Könyvkiadó,1972).

A számítógép “agysejtje”. A leggyorsabb számítógépekben alkalmazott  kriogenetikus tárolók alig nagyobbak, mint az erősen nagyított képen látható szögek. A lemezen 135 apró derékszögű kriotront helyeztek el egy üvegfelületen. Ezek képezik a gép memóriaegységét. Egy ilyen elrendezéssel kb. 40 információt lehet tárolni. Fotó: Erich Hartmann / Magnum. In: A tudomány csodái - Az anyag. A szerző:  Ralph E. Lapp és a Time-Life szerkesztősége.  Műszaki Könyvkiadó,1973Brain cell of the computer. This cryogenic memory contains 135 cryotron switches thus able to store about 40 pieces of information. Photo: Erich Hartmann / Magnum. In: LIFE Science Library - Matter by Ralph E. Lapp and the Editors of TIME - LIFE BOOKS, 1963 (hungarian edition by Műszaki Könyvkiadó,1973).

A számítógép “agysejtje”. A leggyorsabb számítógépekben alkalmazott  kriogenetikus tárolók alig nagyobbak, mint az erősen nagyított képen látható szögek. A lemezen 135 apró derékszögű kriotront helyeztek el egy üvegfelületen. Ezek képezik a gép memóriaegységét. Egy ilyen elrendezéssel kb. 40 információt lehet tárolni. Fotó: Erich Hartmann / Magnum. In: A tudomány csodái - Az anyag. A szerző:  Ralph E. Lapp és a Time-Life szerkesztősége.  Műszaki Könyvkiadó,1973

Brain cell of the computer. This cryogenic memory contains 135 cryotron switches thus able to store about 40 pieces of information. Photo: Erich Hartmann / Magnum. In: LIFE Science Library - Matter by Ralph E. Lapp and the Editors of TIME - LIFE BOOKS, 1963 (hungarian edition by Műszaki Könyvkiadó,1973).

CYDAC
In a groundbreaking application of computers to study biology in the 1960s, researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory developed a system called CYDAC for calculating the amount of DNA present in any given chromosome. Using electron microscope data, CYDAC could “see” each chromosome as 100,000 bits of information. It then compared the data with that of healthy chromosomes and reported abnormalities. CYDAC’s unprecedented precision attracted great interest and led to clinical application of the technology.
photo: llnl/flickr

CYDAC

In a groundbreaking application of computers to study biology in the 1960s, researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory developed a system called CYDAC for calculating the amount of DNA present in any given chromosome. Using electron microscope data, CYDAC could “see” each chromosome as 100,000 bits of information. It then compared the data with that of healthy chromosomes and reported abnormalities. CYDAC’s unprecedented precision attracted great interest and led to clinical application of the technology.

photo: llnl/flickr