Artist concept of control room at Cape (December 2, 1963).
Source: NASA via archive.org

Artist concept of control room at Cape (December 2, 1963).

Source: NASA via archive.org

President Kennedy at Cape Canaveral
President John F. Kennedy, right, gets an explanation of the Saturn V launch system from Dr. Wernher von Braun, center, at Cape Canaveral in November 1963. NASA Deputy Administrator Robert Seamans is to the left of von Braun.
50 years ago, on September 12, 1962, Kennedy gave an address at Rice University making the case for why the United States should go to the moon with the Apollo program, an initiative he’d launched the previous year. “We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things,” said Kennedy, “not because they are easy, but because they are hard. 
Credit: NASA

President Kennedy at Cape Canaveral

President John F. Kennedy, right, gets an explanation of the Saturn V launch system from Dr. Wernher von Braun, center, at Cape Canaveral in November 1963. NASA Deputy Administrator Robert Seamans is to the left of von Braun.

50 years ago, on September 12, 1962, Kennedy gave an address at Rice University making the case for why the United States should go to the moon with the Apollo program, an initiative he’d launched the previous year. “We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things,” said Kennedy, “not because they are easy, but because they are hard. 

Credit: NASA

Artistic impression of the Vehicle Assembly Building, Cape Canaveral. In: Werner Büdeler: Projekt Apollo - Das Abanteuer der Mondlandung. Bertelsmann Sachbuchverlag, 1969.
nb: this is a cropped version of the artwork, the full (but lower resolution) version can be found here

Artistic impression of the Vehicle Assembly Building, Cape Canaveral. In: Werner Büdeler: Projekt Apollo - Das Abanteuer der Mondlandung. Bertelsmann Sachbuchverlag, 1969.

nb: this is a cropped version of the artwork, the full (but lower resolution) version can be found here

John F. Kennedy Space Center. NASA’s thrust-augmented Delta (TAD) lifts off pad 17A at Cape Kennedy, Florida carrying the Syncom Satellite into a 22,300 mile orbit above the Earth. Unused, undated NASA postcard, c1964.
Syncom 3 was the first geostationary communication satellite, launched on August 19, 1964 with the Delta D #25 launch vehicle from Cape Canaveral. The satellite, in orbit near the International Date Line, had the addition of a wideband channel for television and was used to telecast the 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo to the United States. Delta D, aka Thrust Augmented Delta was a Delta C rocket with the Thrust Augmented Thor core plus three Castor 1 boosters. (Wikipedia)

John F. Kennedy Space Center. NASA’s thrust-augmented Delta (TAD) lifts off pad 17A at Cape Kennedy, Florida carrying the Syncom Satellite into a 22,300 mile orbit above the Earth. Unused, undated NASA postcard, c1964.

Syncom 3 was the first geostationary communication satellite, launched on August 19, 1964 with the Delta D #25 launch vehicle from Cape Canaveral. The satellite, in orbit near the International Date Line, had the addition of a wideband channel for television and was used to telecast the 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo to the United States. Delta D, aka Thrust Augmented Delta was a Delta C rocket with the Thrust Augmented Thor core plus three Castor 1 boosters. (Wikipedia)

An aerial view of the rocket booster-mounted Columbia space shuttle being moved by a mobile launcher platform. Photo: AFSC. Location: Cape Canaveral. Date:11/23/1981. via defenseimagery.mil[editor’s note: I think the date given above is inaccurate, STS-1 was launched on April 12, 1981, STS-2 was launched on Nov. 12, 1981, correct me if I am wrong]

An aerial view of the rocket booster-mounted Columbia space shuttle being moved by a mobile launcher platform. Photo: AFSC. Location: Cape Canaveral. Date:11/23/1981.

via defenseimagery.mil

[editor’s note: I think the date given above is inaccurate, STS-1 was launched on April 12, 1981, STS-2 was launched on Nov. 12, 1981, correct me if I am wrong]

At NASA’s Dryden Flight Research Center near Edwards, the orbiter was fastened atop a Boeing-747 for a journey to Cape Canaveral.  Photo: Jon Schneeberger/NatGeo. In: National Geographic, Vol. 159, No. 3, March 1981.
note the Saturn V rocket lying on the ground in the middle and the space shuttle mockup at right

At NASA’s Dryden Flight Research Center near Edwards, the orbiter was fastened atop a Boeing-747 for a journey to Cape Canaveral. Photo: Jon Schneeberger/NatGeo. In: National Geographic, Vol. 159, No. 3, March 1981.

note the Saturn V rocket lying on the ground in the middle and the space shuttle mockup at right

Spaceborn at last? After a two-year delay, the space shuttle is poised for launch this spring from Cape Canaveral. Photo: Jon Schneeberger/NatGeo. In: National Geographic, Vol. 159, No. 3, March 1981.
note the tiny tiny photographer between the caterpillars of the crawler-transporter

Spaceborn at last? After a two-year delay, the space shuttle is poised for launch this spring from Cape Canaveral. Photo: Jon Schneeberger/NatGeo. In: National Geographic, Vol. 159, No. 3, March 1981.

note the tiny tiny photographer between the caterpillars of the crawler-transporter