Women In Steel

1. Ann Zarik has been employed in Carnegie-Illinois Steel Works at Gary, Ind. for five months. She is a flame burner, and her job is to cut out pieces of armour plate for ballistic tests. Her father is a millwright at the Gary Works, and her sweetheart is in the Air Corps stationed in North Africa.

2. Bernice Daunora, 31, is a member of the “top gang” and must wear a “one-hour, lightweight breathing apparatus” as protection against gas escaping from blast furnaces. Mrs. Daunora, who is of Scottish descent, is married, has one son. Her brother is in the armed forces. She has been working at Carnegie-Illinois since last February.

3. Transfer car operator Mae Harris, 23, signals crane man above to return the empty, hot metal ladle to the transfer car (left).

4. Women wearing gas masks clean blast furnace top at Gary, Ind. steel mill.

5. Girl metallurgical observer uses optical pyrometer in determining temperature of steel in open hearth.

6-7. Women In Steel

Photo: Margaret Bourke-White/LIFE.

In: LIFE, 9 Aug 1943

Taking shower with detergent. Photo: W. Eugene Smith/LIFE.
In: LIFE, 26 Sep 1949.

Taking shower with detergent. Photo: W. Eugene Smith/LIFE.

In: LIFE, 26 Sep 1949.

Fluorescent portrait of Arthur Radebaugh. Arthur Radebaugh (1906-1974) paints a nude with fluorescent paint under ultraviolet light in his studio. This image accompanied a feature titled “Black Light” Art in Life magazine on 6 March 1950.
Howard Sochurek’s innovative portrait of the futurist illustrator and industrial designer whose name faded into obscurity but has remained a cult figure. After 20 years as a photojournalist on Life magazine, Sochurek went on to become a pioneer in the use of computer-manipulated photography. 
Photograph: Howard Sochurek/ Time & Life / Getty Images
via The Guardian

Fluorescent portrait of Arthur Radebaugh. Arthur Radebaugh (1906-1974) paints a nude with fluorescent paint under ultraviolet light in his studio. This image accompanied a feature titled “Black Light” Art in Life magazine on 6 March 1950.

Howard Sochurek’s innovative portrait of the futurist illustrator and industrial designer whose name faded into obscurity but has remained a cult figure. After 20 years as a photojournalist on Life magazine, Sochurek went on to become a pioneer in the use of computer-manipulated photography. 

Photograph: Howard Sochurek/ Time & Life / Getty Images

via The Guardian

Szebehely Győző (1921-1997)
The “Three-Body” Expert. Examining a transparent celestial sphere is General Electric’s cheerful specialist in space mechanics, Victor Szebehely (…) Recently he has been directing work on ways to slow down a spaceship before a moon landing. But he calls his most important contribution his study of the “three-body problem”: calculating how three celestial bodies - the earth, the moon and a spaceship, for example - constantly change position in relation to one another. No one formula has yet been found to cover all celestial trios, but Szebehely’s techniques have proved immensely valuable in space exploration. In: LIFE Science Library - Mathematics by David Bergamini and the Editors of LIFE. Time Inc, New York, 1963. Photo: Alfred Eisenstaedt.

Szebehely Győző (1921-1997)

The “Three-Body” Expert. Examining a transparent celestial sphere is General Electric’s cheerful specialist in space mechanics, Victor Szebehely (…) Recently he has been directing work on ways to slow down a spaceship before a moon landing. But he calls his most important contribution his study of the “three-body problem”: calculating how three celestial bodies - the earth, the moon and a spaceship, for example - constantly change position in relation to one another. No one formula has yet been found to cover all celestial trios, but Szebehely’s techniques have proved immensely valuable in space exploration. In: LIFE Science Library - Mathematics by David Bergamini and the Editors of LIFE. Time Inc, New York, 1963. Photo: Alfred Eisenstaedt.

A scale model of the Concorde is getting a water-tunnel test to determine its airflow characteristics. Photo: Office National d’Etudes et Recherches Aeronautiques. In: Flight by H. Guyford Stever, James J. Haggerty and the Editors of LIFE Life Science Library, Time Inc., New York, 1965.

A scale model of the Concorde is getting a water-tunnel test to determine its airflow characteristics. Photo: Office National d’Etudes et Recherches Aeronautiques. In: Flight by H. Guyford Stever, James J. Haggerty and the Editors of LIFE Life Science Library, Time Inc., New York, 1965.

Vought SB2U dive-bombers. Artist: John t. McCoy, Jr. In: LIFE - U.S. Navy special edition, October 28, 1940.

Vought SB2U dive-bombers. Artist: John t. McCoy, Jr. In: LIFE - U.S. Navy special edition, October 28, 1940.

Consolidated PBY flying boats, patrol bombers. Below them is aircraft carrier Lexington. Artist: John T. McCoy, Jr. In: LIFE - U.S. Navy special edition, October 28, 1940.

Consolidated PBY flying boats, patrol bombers. Below them is aircraft carrier Lexington. Artist: John T. McCoy, Jr. In: LIFE - U.S. Navy special edition, October 28, 1940.

#1. Battleship guns prepare to speak. #2. Idaho's elevated guns fire while lowered guns are in position for loading. The three guns in a turret fire almost simultaneously in battle. In: LIFE - U.S. Navy special edition, October 28, 1940.

"Talkers" on the bridge relay commander’s orders by ship telephone to director stations, anti-aircraft machine guns, lookouts, torpedo directors and range finders. Headphones enable them to hear answers above the crash of the destroyer’s eight-in. guns, a formidable armament. In: LIFE - U.S. Navy special edition, October 28, 1940.

"Talkers" on the bridge relay commander’s orders by ship telephone to director stations, anti-aircraft machine guns, lookouts, torpedo directors and range finders. Headphones enable them to hear answers above the crash of the destroyer’s eight-in. guns, a formidable armament. In: LIFE - U.S. Navy special edition, October 28, 1940.

A U.S. sailor appears on this week’s cover because this issue of LIFE is almost entirely devoted to the U.S. Navy. This sailorboy is 18-year-old Joseph John Timpani of Cranston, R.I. Like thousands of young Americans he is giving the next few years of his life to service in the Navy. LIFE - U.S. Navy special edition, October 28, 1940.

A U.S. sailor appears on this week’s cover because this issue of LIFE is almost entirely devoted to the U.S. Navy. This sailorboy is 18-year-old Joseph John Timpani of Cranston, R.I. Like thousands of young Americans he is giving the next few years of his life to service in the Navy. LIFE - U.S. Navy special edition, October 28, 1940.